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Dear Camp Thunderbird 2015 Campers

Dear Camp Thunderbird 2015 Campers,

Today, our summer adventures together came to a close, and you began your journey home. We cannot describe how much we already miss you. While most of the posts on this blog so far have been for your parents, this one is totally and completely for you.

It is not a goodbye post. Because this morning, when we cried and hugged and parted ways, we did not really say goodbye. The end of camp is no end at all, it’s just the end of a beginning. We have heard that lyric sung so many times, but it always rings so true. No matter if this was your first summer at camp or your eighth, it was still just a beginning, the beginning of new adventures, new skills, and new friendships that you will carry with you for the rest of your life.

So this is not a goodbye post because we know our journeys together have only really just begun. We know we will talk and see each other soon. So instead, this is a post to say thank you.

Thank you for spending an amazing four or eight weeks with us. Thank you for laughing, for being yourself, for reminding us what really matters every single day. Thank you for screaming songs at the top of your lungs and for trying new things even when they scared you. Thank you for going on climbing and canoeing and hiking and biking and sailing trips and for your excitement about learning all the skills you need to succeed out in the wilderness.

Thank you for the friendship bracelets and for your perseverance in executing the most perfectly roasted marshmallow. Thank you for the birthday signs and the specialty days and for your endless creativity. Thank you for helping us turn rainy days into exciting adventures.

Thank you for your bravery in performing in talent shows, and thank you for the silliness, smiles, and laughter that made us all so excited to wake up every morning and spend our days with you. Thank you for going back to that activity again and again until you passed that level because you believed in yourself and you knew you could it. Thank you for growing and learning and for helping us grow and learn right alongside you.

This was such an incredible final week of camp, with all of the final shows plus an amazing Superhero-themed co-ed specialty day, a very tasty JL Steak Fry, and a fantastic Final Banquet. Thank you for keeping us smiling and for making wonderful memories until the very end.

As you get older, you will start to see that camp is as much a state of mind as it is an actual place, and soon you will understand that you never really leave Camp Thunderbird. The friendships it has given you will never fade away and the person it has made you into will only grow stronger and prouder.

So as you start your back-to-school shopping and get settled back in to your daily life, remember that camp is always with you, helping you through anything the universe might throw your way.

Thank you for another wonderful, magical, beautiful summer beneath the Minnesota stars. We love you all, and we will see you again soon.

Campingly Yours,

Your Counselors

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All About Our Girls Camp Special Programs–A Chat With Slightly

10660304_10152327210125108_5254006430777171337_n1. What exactly do you do as special programs director?

What a question. I always like to say I’m in charge of the “weird things” at camp. Anything out of the ordinary! I plan all camp evening programs, brother/sister dinners, picture days, athletic matches against other camps, council fires, services, editing newspapers and special dinners, among other things. People have referred to me as the “glitter of camp” more then once; the sparkle, messy, and one that adds a touch of different to the project that is Thunderbird.

2. What is your favorite part about the job?

I just love watching the kids have a good time. Sometimes there are these wildly strange games that just pop into my head, and I just go with it. Watching the kids turn those visions to reality and laugh while doing it makes my day. I also love shopping for the supplies I need and seeing the reaction of the cashier. For example, last week I bought 20 sponges, gummy worms, 16 cans of shaving cream and A LOT of stocking socks. What could I be doing with all that????

 3. How did you get your nickname?11392840_10206847281886341_3711416636988776284_n

Slightly is the name of my favorite lost boy in Peter Pan! I love Peter Pan.

 4. What are some of your favorite activities you have run so far this summer?

Scholarship Auction was one of my favorites. The energy in the room is crazy while paddles are flying up and people are screaming and bidding higher and higher for their favorite prizes. It’s awesome. I also quite enjoyed Extreme Animal Soccer, where we played a very large game of soccer with 5 balls, and I got to randomly call different animals that they had to play soccer like (ex: worm, cow, elephant, T-rex, Kangaroo, ect). Also a big shout out to Zumba night…hilarious.

We also played a great rainy day activity game called all camp Go Get It, where in different groups the campers got a category like “Weirdest Hair Style,” and the group would have two minutes to come up with the weirdest hair style, then show it off. Some of the other categories were “Best Underwater Dance”, “Best Celebrity Encounter Story”, “Weirdest Talent”, and “Best Poem About Cheese.”

Here are some of the cheese poems:

“Please may I have some cheese.

Chedda is betta,

Forget the feta.

If you mix chedda and feta it’ll get betta.

I don’t know fella, when I have mozzarella.”

 

“Cheese is gouda

Cheese is grate!

I like cheese on my macaroni.

Not that velveeta phony.

Some are funky,

others; chunky.

Gorgonzola

Edam

Parmasean

Brie

Can I have some?

That’s nacho cheese.”

 

“Mac and cheese love.

My brie, you are sweet and bitter like my heart.

My cheddar, you are strong and steady. I can always count on you to get me through.

My goat cheese, how stinky you are. But how I love you, in my mac and cheese.”

11036758_10153133769809915_2876067651325957299_o5. What is your favorite part about camp? 

Watching the girls come on their first day and leave on their last is unexplainable. I know it happened to me my first year, but you just grow into exactly who you are. I see it in them every day. Girls at camp are given the opportunity to totally be themselves without judgement, have no shame in anything they do, and truly get to have a great time and realize being yourself is the best way to have true friends. They learn to be independent and strong. They learn that they can do anything if they find the confidence and courage. And most importantly, they learn to love themselves. Being a part of teaching them that in services, council fire, and independent conversations and actions is so so so rewarding.

10527365_10152220508070108_8325474726745128711_n7. If you could live in a house of cheese, what type of cheese would it be and why? 

I’d be homeless! I’m allergic to cheese! I guess I could do goat cheese. Mmmmmm, so delicious on pizza.

8. If you could have any superpower what would it be? 

Flying. I’d get everywhere so fast and I could see the bald eagles really well that way. I guess it’d be pretty cool to move things with my mind too.

9. What will you miss most about camp when summer ends? 

The people for sure. There’s nothing better then spending quality time with people without cell phones and TV’s distracting them. How many times at home do we take the time to make a fire, throw a Frisbee, or play dodgeball? Coming here is like going back to the past and remembering how to have fun. I will definitely miss this, but luckily camp will always be here for anyone who needs it!hi

The Strength Of Camp Togetherness

There are a lot of things that camp can give you, but I think one of the most important things it offers is togetherness—a type of togetherness that is unachievable anywhere else. I never realize until I re-enter the so-called “real world” after camp each summer IMG_5145how lucky I am to have a space where, by the end of breakfast, I have already received a dozen hugs, sung a screaming song, and laughed a hundred times.

It’s like having the world’s biggest family, where you wake up and spend all day every day completely surrounded by love. No matter who you are at camp, no matter who you already know or who you haven’t met, you can walk up to any group or any table and feel welcome and at home. There is this instant familiarity with camp people. It’s hard to describe, but it doesn’t really matter if you actually know one another. If you are both at camp, you have a bond, and you can immediately be your total and complete selves.

At camp you become accustomed to this togetherness rather quickly. Only here would a friend being gone for a day and a night feel like a lifetime; only here would her return be received with cheers and hugs as if she has come back from a harrowing, year-long expedition. Only here can a bond between two friends who have known each other for just a few days equal that of a typical pair who have been friends for years.

It is those bonds, those astonishingly instantaneous bonds of friendship, that are what all this togetherness truly brings. I led a trip last week with a group of eight girls, one of whom was new to camp this summer. She was a second session camper on a trip with girls who had not only been together for the past 10341600_10152327209550108_2765406535099613280_nfour weeks, but many who had been together for the past four years. I didn’t know that this new camper had known the other girls for only a week until somebody told me. The way they laughed and worked together made it seem as if she’d been with them the whole time.

Thunderbird teaches us confidence and resilience and outdoors skills, but I think the most important thing it does is teach us how to be there for each other. This constant camp togetherness means knowing everything about each other. It means seeing each other at our best, our worst, and everything in between. It means accepting each other throughout all of those moments, which always bring us closer in the end. It means learning at very young ages that there are layers to every person and that everyone deserves a chance to be peeled back and understood. It means learning to move on quickly from upsetting moments because why hold on to frustration when we love each other and it is only lunchtime and there is so much more fun and togetherness to be had.

Camp even teacheIMG_7795s you to love those with whom you might not always get along. There might be someone who sometimes makes you angry, but still you have that deep camp connection with her. You have grown with her and struggled with her and learned to solve problems with her. You have learned about her layers and you have grown to understand why she might do the things she does. And even though you know you clash sometimes, you also know that if you ever need her, she will be there.

What is so cool about all this togetherness is that it sticks when camp is over. Sure we all go home and we are not physically together anymore, but those friendships stay strong. That depth and trust endures. As we enter our final week of the summer, we will appreciate every moment of togetherness that we have left. We will remember that the friendships this togetherness has given us are strong enough to last far beyond the summer. Most importantly, we will remember that it won’t be long until we are all together again, feeling like not one moment has passed.

Campingly Yours,

Molly “Pixel” Sprayregen

What Thunderbird Tripping Gives You

When I was fourteen and a camper on the Junior Leader trip, my friends and I used to beg our counselors to stop at any playground we passed. We would shout and shriek with joy when we were given time to swing on swings and slide down slides. We’d take pictures of ourselves on monkey bars and smile through slats in neon tubes that were far too small to fit our teenage bodies.

I don’t know what it was about playing on a playground with my favorite people in the world that made it so much more enticing than it would have ever been for kids our age out in the real world. WIMG_1907e were in high school. Never in our home lives would we have seen a playground and begged to spend some time there.

This love for playgrounds, however, is not specific to my own Thunderbird group of friends.

I recently returned from leading a bike trip with a group of twelve and thirteen year old girls. Along the trail were many playgrounds, playgrounds at which the campers never seemed to get bored of playing. I was so content watching these near eighth graders giggle under jungle gyms as they played hide and seek and pump their legs as hard as they could to swing high into the sky.

This is not the first time I have led this trip, and every time I do, the kids get equally excited about how many playgrounds there are. It makes me so happy to see them just being kids, to throw up their arms and not care about acting cool or seeming old. I think Thunderbird campers love playgrounds because when we are here together with all of our friends, at this place that teaches us to be ourselves and act silly and stop caring what other people think, we realize what is truly important. We realize how silly it is to ever be in a rush to grow up.

The thing is though, these kids may have played on playgrounds, but they also cooked me dinner every night. With very little help and almost no reminders from my co-leader or me, they set up camp and took it down each day. They biked up hills that even I struggled on, and instead of complaining theyIMG_1909 belted Fall Out Boy and Miley Cyrus and Taylor Swift. They cheered on their friends and pushed through some challenges that I truly believe many adults would have given up on. They may have played on playgrounds, but in all the right ways they acted far beyond their years.

I have written before that Thunderbird teaches you that being responsible and mature doesn’t mean you can’t also be youthful and wild and free. I don’t think I ever more clearly witness this perfect balance than when leading Camp Thunderbird trips.

When you’re ouIMG_1908t in the wilderness, there are certain things you simply have to conquer, all of which help you grow up. You have to get to the top of that climb if your campsite is on the other side. You have to learn to light a stove and set up tents and filter water and how to protect yourself from storms and heat and self-doubt.

Tripping gave me confidence in all these things, and for years I have watched it give my campers the same. I have watched it transform them from nervous kids who don’t know if they can make it through a trip into confident young adults who love tripping and believe that they can do anything they set their minds to.

I have also watched tripping teach both my campers and me how wonderful the simple and childish things can be. I have watched it remind us that we do not need an app or a pair of headphones or even the structure of in-camp activities to find joy. Tripping encourages us to look at a pile of rocks and see the giant turtle we can build from it, to transform our long underwear and hiking socks into “fancy” outfits for a dinner party. Tripping shows us that, no matter how old we get, sometimes, all we really need is a good set of monkey bars.

Campingly Yours,

Molly “Pixel” Sprayregen

The Ranchero Village Brings Magic To Thunderbird

11742646_10153457375465833_5190250151480681307_nOn Wednesday, the Ranchero Village brought Girls Camp a little bit of magic with an absolutely amazing Harry Potter specialty day. We all had so much fun dressing up like our favorite witches and wizards and spending the day casting spells, flying on broomsticks, and, like all magical creatures do, dancing and singing at the top of our lungs during meals.IMG_2479

The Rancheros woke each cabin in the morning by handing them their letter of acceptance to the TBird School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Camp was sorted into the four Hogwarts houses, and we planned to spend the day competing for the hallowed House Cup, earning points through various activities. To our shock and dismay, however, as we ate our breakfast at long, communal tables in the Lodge-turned-Great Hall, it was revealed that our beloved Michael had been kidnapped and taken to the Chamber of Secrets! IMG_2829

Clues were left throughout camp to help the campers find Michael. The girls spent the morning gathering six separate pieces of a flashlight, and once it was put together, they were able to use that flashlight to enter the cellar and find the clue to Michael’s whereabouts. Thankfully, the campers cracked the code and Michael was rescued from the deep, dark Chamber of Secrets.

IMG_2456In the afternoon, the campers went from station to magical station, doing exciting things like making wands and transforming two of our staff members, Salt and Farva, into wizards by giving them the longest possible shaving cream beards. We played giants, wizards, and elves (a form of extreme rock paper scissors), had a giant relay race, and we also cooled off with some swimming and a slip ‘n slide.

After a rousing game of Quidditch after dinner, the Ravenclaw House was declared the winner of the House Cup, which is now proudly displayed above the fireplace in the Lodge. The Rancheros did such an amazing job planning and running Harry Potter day. We are so proud of their leadership and hard work that made this day such a success!

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When Rainy Days Are Anything But Gloomy

IMG_1815Every day at Thunderbird is awesome. I didn’t realize until I was much older how lucky I was to attend a summer camp where I got to go to four different activities per day. Even more, I didn’t realize how special it was that each day, I got to choose to go wherever I wanted. At Thunderbird—while we encourage campers to set goals and return to the same activities so that they can improve and excel—campers do not have to commit to only a few activities for an entire summer. Any time you want, you can try something new.

Every day at Thunderbird is awesome, but then there are those special days, the ones that stand out not only because they are different, but because in any other world, they might be considered disappointing.
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Yesterday, it rained so hard that our ball fields at both our boys and girls camps transformed into some rather deep lakes. At Thunderbird, rainy days like that one are not a time to throw in the towel. They are not a time to lie in bed and lament about a ruined day. Instead, they are a time for puddle jumping, for the unforgettable experience of paddling a canoe across a body of water that is normally just a field of grass.

Once the sun began to shine through the clouds, we put on our swimsuits and had so much fun playing in the lakes and puddles that the rain had left behind. Campers were practicing canoe skills and splashing around right in the middle of the soccer field. There was more laughter and shrieks of joy than you’d ever expect to hear on a day where regular activites need to be canceled.

At Thunderbird we learn to make the best out of bad situations, but we also learn that so many situations really aren’t bad at all if you change the way you look at them. A flooded ball field is just an opportunity for a brand new kind of fun, a rare kind that no one who got to play with us in the water yesterday will ever forget.IMG_1817

Throughout my years at Thunderbird, I have had a lot of rainy day fun. Sometimes, during the year, when the rain starts to pour down as I am walking through the city, my first inclination is to grunt and grumble and wish it all away. But then I remember times like yesterday, I remember how many memories the rain has given me, how happy it has made me. I remember not only the times spent puddle jumping and ball field canoeing, but also the times spent huddled beneath a tarp in the woods, a cluster of campers and counselors group hugging and telling stories while waiting for a storm to pass so we can continue our hike or finish cooking our dinner.

Every one of those moments was special because every one of them brought me closer to my campers, friends, and co-leaders. The rain is a magical thing, something that Thunderbird has taught me to never grunt and grumble about. So when I am in the city and the rain begins to fall, I just remember all the things it gave me. As the many grimacing faces shuffle past me, shielding themselves with newspapers, hooded jackets, and umbrellas, I simply open up my arms and smile. It is a far more pleasant way to make it through a rainy day.

I hope with the memories we made yesterday, all of the campers here with us will now be able to do the same.

Campingly Yours,

Molly “Pixel” Sprayregen

Meet Our Girls And Boys Camp Head Counselors!

GIRLS CAMP: FRIZZLE, CBEAR, AND KETCH

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FRIZZLE: SODBUSTER (8-10 YEAR OLDS)

Year At Camp? 2ndScreen Shot 2015-07-10 at 5.12.55 PM

How Did You Get Your Nickname? The humidity in the air gets my hair really frizzy/fuzzy—to the point where I look like I have a lion’s mane. So I’m embracing my hair to its fullest, literally.

Where Are You From? I hail from Chicago, IL.  Go Hawks!

Fun Facts About You? 1. I tell people I’m allergic to green peppers because I don’t like them and would prefer not to share a pizza with someone who eats them. 2. My family has a waterfall named after us in Tennessee. 3. I’ve been skydiving twice!

Favorite Part About Camp? Watching the girls get to do so many different activities in one day and seeing them set goals for themselves and reach them.

Favorite Song To Have A Dance Party In The Lodge To? Call Me Maybe

Favorite Camp Meal? Grilled Cheese and Tomato Soup

If You Could Go On A Road Trip With Anyone, Alive Or Dead, Who Would It Be? Fictional cartoon character, Tito from Rocket Power. Or Amy Poehler. Either works.

When You Were Little, What Did You Want To Be When You Grew Up? An Underwater Photographer

What Are Your Summer Goals? To stay up on waterskis, learn how to say the alphabet backwards really fast, and become a good toenail painter. Most of all, TO HAVE FUN!!!

CBEAR: RANCHERO (11-12 YEAR OLDS)

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Year At Camp? Early years at Family Camp, 6 years as a camper, and 9 as a staff member

How Did You Get Your Nickname? In the winter of 2004, I was ice fishing in Lake Plantagenet and a bear bit off half of my catch as I was reeling it in (‘see bear!’). This story may or may not be contested.

Where Are You From? Des Moines, Iowa

Fun Facts About You? 1. I am an Irish twin 2. I like to flip crutches upside down and use them as stilts 3. I used to lead camping trips to view active volcano eruptions in Guatemala.

Favorite Part About Camp? Nature walks, waterskiing, not taking myself too seriously, facing fears, yoga by the lake, going on trips, Petrie’s stories!

Favorite Song To Have A Dance Party In The Lodge To? Cotton-Eyed Joe

Favorite Camp Meal? Egg salad sandwiches and pudding pops while watching Mama Mae’s stomp n’ grind

If You Could Go On A Road Trip With Anyone, Alive Or Dead, Who Would It Be? Bill Grogan’s Goat

When You Were Little, What Did You Want To Be When You Grew Up? A Backpacking Photographer for National Geographic. I even exchanged a few emails with one once!

What Are Your Summer Goals? 1. Help Rancheros accomplish their goals! 2. Bring back/teach three songs we used to sing in the lodge 3. Share at a Services or Council Fire 4. Visit ‘The Lost 40’ – look it up!

KETCH: HOMESTEAD (13-14 YEAR OLDS)

Screen Shot 2015-07-10 at 5.11.04 PMYear At Camp? 8th

How Did You Get Your Nickname? My first time at Thunderbird I kept asking for ketchup and tabasco because it was a bit rough adjusting to American food. Thanks Tres for Cholula!

Where Are You From? Monterrey, México.

Fun Facts About You? 1. I was born at 22 weeks, weighed 1.7 pounds and was 9 inches tall. 2. I do modern dance and also own a fashion brand called Two & Even. 3. I am not a cat person, but I absolutely adore Blue Sphynx cats and would love to own one!

Favorite Part About Camp? How I get to disconnect from the outside world and get in touch with nature.

Favorite Song To Have A Dance Party In The Lodge To? Brave by Sara Bareilles.

Favorite Camp Meal? Salad Bar and Potato Bar

If You Could Go On A Road Trip With Anyone, Alive Or Dead, Who Would It Be? Ingrid Michaelson, Regina Spektor and Sara Bareilles.

When You Were Little, What Did You Want To Be When You Grew Up? I wanted to be a professional ballet dancer so badly that instead of watching cartoons, I would watch classical ballet performances on A&E.

What Are Your Summer Goals? 1. Climb to the top of the climbing wall (Done!) 2. Stand up on waterskis (Done!) 3. Make it from my cabin in the Homestead village all the way to the lodge in less than 4 minutes. (still working on it)

BOYS CAMP: CICERO, DEWEY, LOON, AND JUICE

 CICERO: CROW (AGE 8-10)

CiceroYear At Camp? 3rd

Where Are You From? Boston, MA

Fun Facts About You? 1. I work as an outdoor educator during the rest of the year 2. I love Ketchup 3. I’m more of a cat person than a dog person

Favorite Part About Camp? It has to be ice-cream after Sunday lunch.

Favorite Song To Have A Dance Party To? Shut Up and Dance

Favorite Camp Meal? Corndogs and Mac n Cheese

If You Could Go On A Road Trip With Anyone, Alive Or Dead, Who Would It Be? Cicero, as in the Roman Orator, not myself. But I suppose I would have to learn Greek first.

When You Were Little, What Did You Want To Be When You Grew Up? A baseball player

What Is Your Summer Goal? To make sure every camper has an awesome time in my village

DEWEY: SIOUX (AGE 11) 

James PughYear At Camp? 4th

Where Are You From? Manchester, England

Fun Facts About You? 1. I have jumped out the second deck of a sailing cruise ship in the Caribbean. 2. I can bend my legs almost completely backwards like a bird. 3. I was born deaf!

Favorite Part About Camp? Speciality Days

Favorite Song To Have A Dance Party To? Anything by Daft Punk

Favorite Camp Meal? Thai Curry!

If You Could Go On A Road Trip With Anyone, Alive Or Dead, Who Would It Be? Bill Murray

When You Were Little, What Did You Want To Be When You Grew Up? A Policeman

What Are Your Summer Goals? To perform at every services/council fire, and to get up on waterskis!

IROQUOIS: LOON (AGE 12)Screen Shot 2015-07-15 at 4.17.31 PM

Year At Camp? 4th

Where Are You From? Ohio

Fun Facts About You? 1. I put chips on my sandwiches 2. I am always spinning my keys around my fingers 3. I really want a Giant Anteater as a pet

Favorite Part About Camp? The Campers!

Favorite Camp Meal? Lasagna and Breadsticks

If You Could Go On A Road Trip With Anyone, Alive Or Dead, Who Would It Be? Mahatma Gandhi

When You Were Little, What Did You Want To Be When You Grew Up? A Spy

What Are Your Summer Goals?  1. Run a happy village 2. Get my campers on trip as much as possible

JUICE: CHIPPEWA (AGE 13-14)

image (1)Year At Camp? 4th

Fun Facts About You? 1. I lived in Australia for 2 years.  2. I can roll my tongue.  3. I once went on a road trip with Cheif, Flick, Zing, and Zooko in an old school bus with a massive Thunderbird painted on the hood!

Favorite Part About Camp? Services

Favorite Song To Have A Dance Party To? Anything Bluegrass

Favorite Camp Meal? Grilled Cheese and Tomato Soup

If You Could Go On A Road Trip With Anyone, Alive Or Dead, Who Would It Be?  Cheif, Flick, Zing, and Zooko!  Or…Dewey, Loon, and Cicero

What Are Your Summer Goal(s)?  1. Attending broga as least once 2. Visiting the black rafts at least once a week  3. Making sure each Chip camper has a good time and grows as a person

Anything Else We Should Know About You?  My first three summers at camp were 6 years ago!

A Note From The JL Girls

Our Junior Leaders get to spend five weeks of their final summer as campers hiking and climbing across the Northwestern United States and Canada. Last week, our JL girls dropped us a note to tell us how their trip is going, and it seems like they are having a pretty wonderful time. Here is what they had to say:

Even after only two weeks on trip, it’s clear that JL is an experience unlike any other. We’ve trekked through miles of mud and mosquitos, tripped across freezing rivers, huddled beneath trees in the pouring rain, and enjoyed every second of it.

IMG_1789Recently, we completed a 4-day backpacking trip in the Wind River Range. Between hiking through breathtaking mountains and staying up late laughing in our tents, there was little room to worry about anything. On trip, we can slow down and enjoy the things in life that make us smile. We eat, sleep, poop, laugh, and sing together, and the result is the closest-knit group of girls you’ll ever meet.

We’ve been together for so long that we can have conversations for hours where every sentence starts with, “Remember that time when…?” We wouldn’t dress up in crazy red, white, and blue outfits on the 4th of July and jump into the middle of the Jackson Hole parade with anyone else.

JL has allowed us to break through obstacles in a way we never thought possible. Throughout our 3 days of climbing, the words “I can’t” weren’t heard even once. Instead, we pushed past fears and felt the accomplishment of tackling a wall and reaching the top. The same is true when we hike up any tough hill, and once we’re at the top, nothing seems impossible anymore.

JL is singing in the vans, driving each other crazy, sleeping in a tent every night, laughing until our stomachs ache, not showering for 10 days at a time and being totally ok with it! JL is a two-month break from Instagram, annoying group messages, and all the drama of high school. It is a chance to grow up with the most amazing and supportive group of people, but also a rare opportunity to be crazy, ridiculous, and immature in all the best ways. As we spend our last summer together, there is no doubt in our minds that JL is the adventure of a lifetime. 

 Love,

The JL Girls of 2015

The End Of A Beginning

 

Today, we s10469218_4649354589275_1499747030721840155_nay goodbye to our wonderful first session campers. We can’t believe how quickly these first four weeks flew by, and we can’t put into words how much we are going to miss them. While we are so sad to see our first session campers go, we are so happy to have gotten the chance to spend time with them this summer, the chance to grow, learn, and laugh with them.

As we’ve wrapped up the session, these past few days have been a whirlwind of fun, from a midnight pizza dance party to fantastic drama and gymnastics shows to the Paul Bunyan all-you-can-eat ice cream sundae extravaganza—awarded to one cabin in each village that received the best scores for cabin cleanup each morning—to our final Fancy Dinner, where we dress up in our fanciest (i.e. silliest) attire to celebrate the end of another incredible first session.

To the campers leaving us today, we hope you think of Thunderbird throughout the rest of your summer and your school year because we will certainly be thinking of you. We hope you smile when you remember the incredible memories you’ve made here and how many more are waiting to be made when you return next summer. We cannot wait to see you here again. As the buses pulled away with all of you, camp grew a little bit quieter. We hope you know that as you read your plane letters and say your last goodbyes at the airport, we are here missing your singinIMG_7981g and laughter filling the air.

As one of our most beloved camp songs reminds us, the end of camp is no end at all, it’s just the end of a beginning. Here at Thunderbird, this end signals the beginning of a brand new session. To our second session campers getting ready to head to camp tomorrow morning, we are so excited to see you! We hope you are ready to have the greatest summer of your lives. Your amazing counselors cannot wait to meet you, and our eight-week campers are eagerly awaiting the sounds of your buses driving down the road so they can welcome you to Thunderbird.

See you all soon!!!

4th of July, Thunder The Sea, and Mustaches: Our First Session Specialty Days

One thing that I always think of when I think of camp is dance parties, the greatest dance parties in the world. There is a magic to jumping up and down while screaming out One Direction and Taylor Swift and Miley Cyrus at the top of your lungs in a place where you are so comfortable in your own skin that you couldn’t care less how you sound or look or about the fact that you’re t-shirt is probably drenched in sweat.

None of that matters when the 150 other people around you are screaming just as loud and jumping just as high. None of that matters when the 150 other people around you are your favorite people in the world, people who would far prefer to dance crazy than dance cool.

Back in 2011, I wrote this about camp for Women’s Adventure Magazine:

At these [dance] parties, a girl becomes a hero when she teases her hair and rubs dirt on her face to look like a cavewoman, when she wears mismatched sequined clothes and adds a sombrero to accent the sparkle. I have never felt more like a supermodel than the night I spent running around camp in a chicken suit. Never have more people envied me.

At camp, crazy is cool. Laughter makes anyone beautiful, and the crazier we dance together, the closer we become.”

I think as you get older at camp, all of this only becomes more important. As kids begin to grow up—faster these days than they ever did before—and face the endless school pressures of fitting in, it is things like these Thunderbird dance parties that show them just how happy they can be when they let down their guard and are being nothing but themselves.

What’s even better is that these dance parties are usually accompanied by fantastic days because they almost always occur on specialty days. A few times each summer, we hand the reigns over to a village of campers and let them plan the day. Campers get to select a theme and plan a day of meals and activities around it.

Specialty day gives campers a chance to use creativity and imagination to invent their own fun.

We have had some incredible specialty days so far this summer. At Girls Camp, the Sodbusters, our youngest village, planned Thunder the Sea, an ocean-themed day that began with an exciting row boat battle game and ended with a marvelous counselor fashion show. Each cabin was given a prop and assigned the task of dressing up their counselors in sea-themed attire. We all had so much fun watching them strut across the stage.

The Sodbusters did a great job running the day. From the moment they ran through the Homestead and Ranchero villages to wake the rest of the campers up for breakfast, their energy and enthusiasm helped make each and every activity a blast.

Boys Camp’s youngest village, Crow, told the rest of camp that their specialty day was Mustache Day, but, little did everyone else know it’d be shockingly interrupted when our assistant director, Chuckles, was kidnapped! Luckily, the boys already had their detective mustaches ready, and they spent the day searching for clues and tracking Chuckles down. The campers located him at the waterfront at the end of the day, where his captors set him free.

Then, of course, there was the 4th of July, which has become an all time favorite holiday for many of our campers and staff. Nowhere else that I have found knows how to celebrate quite like Thunderbird. No matter what country you hail from, the dance parties, talent shows, and all-camp games make it hard not to feel some good old U.S patriotism.

Over at Girls Camp, the Fourth of July is run by the Homestead village, our oldest in-camp girls. The Homesteaders planned an amazing Independence Day. In the morning, we painted our faces, dressed in red, white, and blue, feasted on waffle sticks for breakfast, and then battled it out all morning long in our annual capture the flag competition. The red team and blue team tied at the end of an energetic, fun-filled game. While no flags were captured, there were certainly a lot of laughs along the way. Later in the day we enjoyed a waterfront obstacle course, a slip ‘n slide, and other fun activities.

At Boys Camp, Independence Day is also the specialty day for the oldest campers, the Chippewa village. On the evening of July 3rd, the Boys Camp campers were assigned to either the red, white, blue, or green team. Each team came up with a chant, and they spent the morning of the 4th competing in a relay race all over camp. The race involved canoeing and fun yakking at the waterfront as well as an epic sprint to the lower ball field, where teams competed to be the first to build a fire large enough to burn a rope hanging over each fire pit. After the red team was declared the victor, the day continued with capture the flag and an all-camp swim.

On July 4th evening, Boys and Girls Camp came together for the Hootenanny, our annual co-ed talent show. The boys and girls sat on Boys Camp’s sand hill, enjoying popsicles while watching their friends perform some pretty amazing talents, from a great dance by Girls Camp’s youngest cabin, Durango, to some Rubix Cube solving by a few boys camp campers to a beautiful rendition of Vance Joy’s Riptide, sung by some talented Homestead girls. We were so proud of each and every camper who had the courage to stand up in front of Thunderbird and show off their amazing talents.

And of course, all of our specialty day meals were accompanied by some pretty amazing dance parties.

Our Sodbuster, Crow, Homestead, and Chippewa villages planned some wonderful specialty days. We cannot wait to see what the rest of the villages cook up second session!

Keep dancing, Thunderbird.

Campingly Yours,

Molly “Pixel” Sprayregen